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Aux Send MON vs Aux Send FX

August 13, 2012 3:32 AM

On my mixer, why does the AUX MON leave before the channel fader, and the AUX FX after?

On my Tapco Blend 6 mixer, there is the possibility of sending the signal of one or more tracks to an Aux Send MON and/or an Aux Send FX. The first one is meant for a monitor, and the second for an external effect.

My question concerns the placement of these auxiliaries in the tracks: the first one leaves before the channel fader, and the second one leaves after.

This means the channel volume fader has no effect on the monitor, but it does on the effect. Why is it not the other way around? Wouldn't you want to send the signal straight to the external effect, but have a weighed signal for the monitor?

Also, in this way it's not possible to have only the sound of the effect in the main mix, without the clean sound coming from the tracks, something that would be possible if one uses the MON instead of FX for the effect.

I'm asking this purely out of interest, not because I'm having trouble using the mixer.

Thanks!
posted by mahershalal (7 comments total)

Really those are "pre-fader" and "post-fader" sends. For effect sends, 99% of the time, you're going to want to use the "AUX FX" (post-fader) send--you usually want the balance between the dry signal and the effect return to remain constant, even if the track's fader is riding up and down.

When mixing recorded music, the only time I ever use pre-fader (AUX MON, in this case) sends is to really place a sound inside a space (usually with reverbs). That way, when the dry fader rides up and down, the effect level stays the same (sort of a "walking-away" effect, if you lower the track volume and keep the reverb level the same). You can hear this going into the last section on my Karma Police cover, from 2:35 onwards.

The other reason your mixer has the AUX MON setting is so you can set up a separate monitor mix. Sometimes if you're performing (or recording), you'll want to hear (for example) more of yourself, and no bass, or more of the keys and less drums, etc. This way, you use the send knob to control the balance in the monitor mix while leaving the main mix unaffected.
posted by uncleozzy at 6:59 AM on August 13, 2012 [1 favorite]


you usually want the balance between the dry signal and the effect return to remain constant, even if the track's fader is riding up and down.

Of course, that's the reason. Thanks!

Although now I still wonder how to get only the effect, without the dry sound, in the main mix
posted by mahershalal at 12:21 PM on August 13, 2012


Although now I still wonder how to get only the effect, without the dry sound, in the main mix

1: source material on channel 1. make sure AUX MON on channel 3-4 is ALL THE WAY DOWN
2: plug in FX to aux send one, but instead of plugging the outputs of the FX unit into aux return, plug them into the inputs of 3-4. Turn the blend of the fx unit to 100% wet.
3. turn down the level on channel 1. turn up the level of 3-4.

3-4 will be effects only, channel 1 is dry signal.


turning up AUX MON on 3-4 will create a feedback loop, which can be cool but has the potential to get really loud and piercing, use caution and try not to blow up your speakers or eardrums.
if you're using a delay or other time based signal it can sound great though!
posted by dubold at 1:28 PM on August 13, 2012


dubold: terrific! Going to experiment first thing tomorrow.
posted by mahershalal at 3:22 PM on August 13, 2012


I wish more cheap mixers had a "pre/post fader" switch on their aux sends. I often want a 100% wet signal from the FX but I can't do that, since FX send is usually hardwired to be post-fader.
posted by chimaera at 5:11 PM on August 13, 2012


Isn't the MON output to run to another Mixer where you can then mix a Monitor mix for people recording?
posted by mary8nne at 6:39 AM on September 5, 2012


Not really, no - not on the Tapco Blend 6 mixer, anyway.

Although honestly I'm having a little trouble understanding your question.

There's only one MON (Aux 1) output for the whole desk, what comes out of that is a result of however you set the Aux 1 knobs on each channel. There's no need to run that output to another mixer - what exactly are you "mixing" in that second mixer? And what does it have to do with people recording ? I'm not trying to be snarky, I'm genuinely confused about what you think the purpose of the MON out is.
posted by soundguy99 at 11:16 PM on September 5, 2012


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